Feb 212012
 

towel animal

When most people hear the word “towels”, they bring to mind the soft rectangular squares of fabric used for drying off after a bath or shower. For those with creative minds, however, bath towels and hand towels can provide a rich crafting ground for fun and gift-worthy projects. As an added bonus, most towel craft projects can be unwound or unwoven to serve their more familiar purpose after the owner is done displaying them.

Towel Origami

An art form that’s gained popularity on cruise ships worldwide, delighted patrons have embraced this unusual craft on dry land as well. In addition to photo-filled books for sale that instruct novices how to make swans, turtles and more out of their towels, video sharing social sites also offer free videos for the curious. Towel origami is a great way for those interested in the traditional paper style of origami to get some experience without risking papercuts.

Boo Boo Bunnies

This super-easy craft project only requires a washcloth, rubber band, and some adhesive details like googly eyes and a pom pom. Simply roll the washcloth into a long tube, curve into a U, fold the U in half lengthwise and secure at this second fold with the rubber band. The result will be a small O shape at the bottom, a head-like bump at the front, and two tails that resemble ears above the head. Glue the eyes and nose at the appropriate places and you have a boo boo bunny! If a child is injured, an ice cube can be placed in the center of the O to enable easy handling and application to the injured area.

Bleach Art

This project works best with darker colored towels or mats and a large stencil of your desired shape. Using a clean, dry towel, place flat on an area that won’t be affected by discoloring, such as a driveway or front lawn. Fill a cheap spray bottle with laundry bleach (be sure to mark the bottle as poison for safety’s sake). Placing the stencil on the towel or mat and either securing with painter’s tape or a gloved hand, gently spray the bleach at the void area from a distance of about a foot. This will discolor the towel into a lighter hue in the shape of the stencil. For added style, spray around the edges of the stencil to make a unique frame effect. Let the towel dry completely, then wash alone to “set” the design.

Feb 022012
 

Monogram

Calligraphy – sometimes called the art of fancy lettering – might, given the advent of the digital age, not be as popular as it once was, but it’s making something of a comeback disguised as the art of monogramming.

Styles of calligraphy are usually categorized in terms of factors like the language the work is written in and the country that language originated in, and, as such, styles like Tibetan calligraphy, which used to be practiced by the High Lamas, and Islamic calligraphy, which is written in Arabic, are common. The art of monogramming, on the other hand, involves embroidering the owner’s initials on articles of clothing like bathrobes or towels, and, therefore, doesn’t involve using any one particular language.

While those who indulge in the art of calligraphy use specialized pens to write on paper, parchment or similar surfaces, those who are in the business of creating monogrammed towels, robes and other such items will embroider the owner’s initials directly onto the fabric. Similarly, while most calligraphists will use black ink – although the use of colored ink is not unknown – monograms can be embroidered in a variety of different colors, including such exotic hues as papaya, espresso and cranberry.

One aspect common to both calligraphy and monogramming is the use of different fonts, and, in calligraphy, this would especially apply to documents written in English. A font can best be described as a style of lettering, and common fonts would include Ariel, Calibri and Times New Roman. Those buying new towels or bathrobes can often choose the type of font they would like their initials embroidered in, and these fonts can range from those utilizing simple, utilitarian styles to those that exhibit greater flourish and are, perhaps, more aesthetically pleasing. Another curious fact that’s relevant only to the art of monogramming is that the middle initial is always slightly larger than the other two.

Fine works of calligraphy are always treasured, and, in the same way, monogrammed bathrobes, towels and even bath mats are always thought of as just a little bit classier than items without monograms.