Apr 292013
 

Mudanya_13Legend has it that towels were invented in the Turkish city of Bursa, and, although this may or may not be true, beautiful Bursa is most certainly worth a visit.

Bursa – the jewel of Northwestern Turkey – is home to just under two million people, and, every year, more and more tourists are discovering this city’s fascinating mix of history and natural wonders. From bubbling hot springs to marvelously informational museums and from vibrant shopping centers to magnificent marble palaces, Bursa has it all, and there can be nothing better than lounging around on soft and fluffy monogrammed towels at the gorgeously appointed Celik Palas thermal bath.

Towels and other bathroom accessories – including bath mats and bathrobes – have many uses in today’s society, and, for instance, there’s most definitely no shortage of bath mat-like prayer rugs to be seen in Bursa’s main attraction: the Ulu Camii mosque. Also known as the Bursa Grand Mosque, Ulu Camii is a brilliant example of early Ottoman architecture and sports twin minarets as well as no less than 20 decorated domes. The mosque is, however, best known for housing the largest collection of incidental Islamic calligraphy in the world, and every tourist who visits this divine building simply has no choice but to gape at the wonderful writings on its walls.

Bursa is also located close to several of the nicest beaches found on Turkey’s northwestern coast, including Kursunlu, Armutlu and magnificent Mudanya, which lies on the Marmara Sea’s stunning Gulf of Gemlik. Robes and swimsuits are the costume de rigueur for all Bursa beaches, and the town’s proximity to so many attractive bathing venues – and the resulting need for so many people to get dry – could possibly just have something to do with why the town is credited for inventing towels.

Turkey is known for many things – including tasty Turkish Delight and steamy Turkish baths – but towels are generally not the first things that spring to mind when the prospective tourist thinks about visiting this fascinating country. Given Bursa’s unique history, however, perhaps they should be.

Apr 262013
 

towelsThe majority of today’s towels and robes, and even most bath mats, are made out of Terrycloth, a little known but very common type of fabric that pops up in the most interesting of places.

What ties the sport of cricket, squalling babies, bath time, clothing items and bed-linen together? If you answered “Terrycloth” – or Terry toweling as it is also known – you would be correct. Due to the very specific way that Terry cloth is manufactured, it has an extremely high absorbency rate, which makes it ideal to use in any situation where cloth is needed to soak up large amounts of liquid. Terry also turns up in the unlikeliest of places, and can be found making up wristbands, diapers, sheets, hats, bathrobes, and, of course, towels.

Terry cloth is so special because, while one side of the fabric is straight, the other side is woven in such a way that long loops are formed from each individual strand of cotton. The general terry rule is the longer the loop, the more absorbent the fabric will be, and this is because a longer loop means there is more open fabric area to absorb liquid. Terry cloth is usually manufactured completely out of cotton, but there are instances where lycra and polyester are also thrown into the mix. The manufacturing process, which is, furthermore, extremely complex, involves the fabric being woven on special looms sporting two longitudinal warp beams, and the weaving technique that produces terry cloth is known as “warp knitting”.

Although extremely popular, terrycloth isn’t the only fabric that towels – even monogrammed towels – are made of, and, these days, these bathroom necessities are also made of synthetic microfiber and waffle fabric. Nothing beats the warmth, comfort and absorbency of terry cloth, however, and it’s no wonder that bath robes, bath towels, hand towels and bath mats are almost exclusively made out of this versatile fabric.

Terrycloth may not be named after anyone – the name most likely comes from the French work “terir” meaning to pull through – but almost everyone knows its name.

Apr 182013
 

bath towels

These days, remodeling a bathroom can cost many thousands of dollars. With the economy still rather fragile, some people are simply unable to afford such a luxury. However, that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. Here are six tips for improving a bathroom on a budget.

Wallpaper

Remove the old wallpaper by renting a steamer. Then paint the walls with a color that matches your towels.

Bathroom

Go to one of the popular DIY centers and replace your old toilet with a new one. Check the sales papers beforehand for discounts. You’re sure to find a toilet for sale at an affordable price.

Vanity

After you’ve replaced your toilet, do the same thing with your old vanity. Again, check the sales papers and visit one of the popular DIY centers. There are always lots of vanity options to choose from.

Old towels

Invest in a good set of towels. These will cost you more than cheap alternatives. However, the cost will be worth it in the long run. So throw out those old ones and consider Egyptian, Supima, Bamboo or other quality types. The best place to find them is online for the largest selection.

Grungy bathtub

This doesn’t mean replacing the bathtub, because to do so would cost big money. Instead, give your bathtub a good cleaning. You’ll be surprised at how much you like your bathtub once you clean it out.

Old shower curtain or shower door

Replace your old shower curtain with a new one that matches your towels. Or replace your old shower door with a new shower door.