May 082013
 

matsThere’s nothing quite as nice for any bathroom as a quality bath mat. High quality mats come in bamboo, Egyptian cotton, supima, organic and more. But one thing that you’ll find with all the good bath mats is a lack of a rubber backing. It’s a sure sign of quality, because there are a number of problems associated with mats that have rubber backs. What are reasons to avoid rubber backed bathroom mats?

Mats with rubber backings can’t go in the dryer

If you like to throw your bathroom mat in the dryer, chances are you’re ignoring the fact that its rubber backing will eventually deteriorate. You’re probably telling yourself,”I didn’t pay that much for this mat. So it doesn’t matter.”

Change your attitude and invest in a quality bath mat. Purchase one that can be washed and dried with ease. If it looks flat after cleaning, give your bath mat a vigorous shake.

The rubber backing of a bath mat gets moldy over time

Even if you’ve never put your bath mat with a rubber backing in the dryer, you’ve got another problem. Rubber backings get moldy over time. You’re not going to want a mat with a moldy backing. So you’ll throw it out and get a new one. Buy a superior mat instead, and get rid of the mold problem forever.

A rubber backing can discolor your bathroom floor

Your bathroom floors are important. So why buy a bathroom mat that could stain it? A good reason to avoid rubber backed bath mats is because they can discolor your bathroom floor.

Dirt is hard to get out of the rubber of a bath mat

You’ve got small kids, a cat or a dog. Accidents happen, and when urine comes in contact with the rubber backing of a bath mat, you’re headed for trouble. You can try getting rid of the odor with vinegar and water or water and ammonia, but why not just buy a decent bath mat with no rubber backing so that you can wash urine out easily?

Sep 092011
 

Bath Mat

A lot has been written about towels – even monogrammed towels – as well as about bathrobes, but bath mats tend to be the country cousins of the bathroom-decor world as not much is ever heard about them. This is not quite fair, however, as, just like towels and robes, every single bath mat has a lot to offer.

There are several different types and brands of bath mats to choose from, and, if one is decorating a bathroom on a budget, then pure cotton bath mats are the way to go as these are generally the least expensive. They also come in a variety of different colors – enough to match any color-scheme – including smoke blue, garnet red, tearose and moss. Bamboo bath mats, on the other hand, come in such brilliant and weather-themed hues as rain and cloud, and they are made of 60% combed Egyptian cotton and 40% bamboo rayon.

Elegance bath mats are made solely of long staple Turkish cotton, and these reversible mats are also completely machine washable. The words seafoam, moonstone and desert sand conjure up visions of moonlit vistas on far away shores, but they should also conjure visions of beautiful bath mats, and this is merely a sampling of the shades the Elegance mats are available in. Unlike the Elegance mats, Supima bath mats are made of 100% American Supima cotton, and they are known for their sheer luxuriousness. Supima mats also come in colors that will put one in mind of dinner – examples include merlot, bisque and butter – and they are the perfect side-dish to any main bathroom meal.

The most eco-friendly of all the bath mat types must surely be the organic bath mats, which, as their name suggests, are made of certified organically grown cotton. These mats are manufactured in Portugal, and their stunning color options include stone, coffee and Aegean blue. Egyptian cotton mats are different from the rest as they are textured, and they also extremely absorbent because of their unusual thickness. Starkly simple white, cream and charcoal are on the Egyptian cotton bath mat color menu, as are the more complex – but equally as exquisite – shades of air blue, espresso and lite gold.

Given all of the above choices, no one can say that there isn’t a bath mat to suit every single person, every single bathroom and every single occasion.

May 022011
 

bamboo2

What does it mean to be eco friendly? It means choosing natural products to use during your life. It is not only good for the environment, living an eco friendly life is also good for your health.

When is the best time to start living this way? Now! If you start slowly, eventually you will have a lifestyle change that you will enjoy and feel good about.

Decide to reduce the amount of products you’re using that are harmful to the environment. Look at what you can reuse instead of throw away. Start recycling if you aren’t already. Join “green” organizations that put the environment as their focus. Finally, choose eco friendly products. One area to focus on is the bathroom.

Bamboo

Bamboo is a good product to choose for an eco friendly life, because it is cultivated with no pesticides or chemicals. It requires only natural rainfall, which means that water does not have to be piped in. Bamboo is highly renewable. When a cane is cut, it grows up to 12 inches a day. In addition, material made from Bamboo is good for people with skin conditions, because it has a natural antibacterial component. Bamboo rayon is used in bathrobes and towels. The result is a soft, high quality towel or bathrobe.

Organic towels

Look for organic towels made from 100 percent organic cotton. Cotton that is not grown organically is grown with pesticides that are damaging to the soil, air and water.

Soap, shampoo and conditioner

Take a look at the soap, shampoo and conditioner you’re using. Are they eco friendly? Many of these cleaning agents contain harmful chemicals that can be irritating to the skin and harmful to the environment. Instead, choose soaps, shampoos and conditioners made from plants or vegetable oils. Look for homemade products.

Feb 252011
 

bath

The word “Zen” is used in popular culture in many ways, but its real meaning is often obscured under layers of confusion. Zen is a lineage, or school, of Mahayana Buddhism. The religion is most prevalent in Japan, but Zen practitioners can be found in other countries around Southeast Asia.

The “Protestantism” of Buddhism

Zen developed as a reaction to more hierarchical, ritualistic forms of Buddhism that were developing in other parts of Asia. Zen practitioners called for a return to Buddhism’s most basic principles, leaving behind some of the ostentation that was forming within other Buddhist schools. Like early Protestant Christians, Zen practitioners wanted a return to the basics of their faith.

The Zen Style

As a result of this call for simplicity, the exterior style of Zen looks and feels very different from other types of Buddhism, such as what is commonly called Tibetan Buddhism. Zen monks and nuns favor simple, neutral-colored robes over the brighter maroons and saffrons in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism. Their temples, too, have a clean, open, simple look and feel that contrasts sharply from the intricate ornamentation of a Tibetan Buddhist temple.

Zen Ideas for the Home and Bathroom

If you like the look and feel of the open spaces, clean lines, and soft earth tones of the Zen style, consider simplifying your own home into a Zen-like sanctuary. Here are some tips for your making your home more Zen-like:

  • Get away from bright, loud colors and go with tans, chocolates, blacks, and creams instead
  • Use light-colored woods, especially bamboo
  • Decorate the walls sparely, with prints that convey a spiritual meaning
  • Reduce heavy drapes and fill the house with natural light

For your bathroom, try these tips:

  • Use bamboo towels for eco-friendliness and comfort
  • Bamboo bath rugs and bamboo bath mats are also available
  • Trade in the hot pink bathrobe for a tan or cream-colored bathrobe
  • Keep decoration minimal, and use a shade-loving house plant to add a splash of color

Ultimately, Zen is a spiritual tradition and a way of life, not a decorating style. However, you can encourage your inner peace by letting your inner sanctum copy Zen’s design principles.

 

Feb 032011
 

Organic Mats

Along with bathrobes, hand towels and bath towels, bath mats have been around for a long time. There is, however, far more to the simple tubmat than meets the eye, and those interested in reading up on the history of the mat will, no doubt, be fascinated by what they uncover.

Today the luxury bath mat comes in several styles, including the reversible bamboo mat of combed Egyptian cotton and bamboo rayon and the incredibly soft Supima bath mat, available in such interesting colors as merlot, chestnut and marine. Far less luxurious and eco friendly, however, were the Marsden or Marston mats that were popular during World War II, which were made of perforated steel and which were used to build temporary landing strips and runways.

Mats have been around for thousands of years – the hand-woven funeral mats on display at the Pecos Rio Grande Museum in Arizona were created between 2,000 an 5,000 years ago – and, as today’s quality mats can testify, cotton bath mats are now made with an extremely high degree of sophistication. The Organic bath mats, for instance, are manufactured in Portugal of 100% certified organic cotton, while the Elegance bath mats are made of long staple Turkish cotton and are equally at home in the bathroom or the upscale spa.

Although some mats are made from the tough brown and white coir fibers found in coconut husks, luxury bath mats, just like quality bath robes, towels and kids robes, are made from materials such as organic cotton, rayon and supima cotton. For those who like matching sets, Terry Velour Turkish bathrobes and towels can be paired with made-in-Turkey Supima mats while a Kimono Waffle bathrobe – complete with fancy monogram and made from 65% natural cotton – can be combined with a machine washable Pure Cotton bath mat to make the perfect bathroom linen set.

No matter what the history of the mat actually is, today’s best dressed bathrooms should all sport quality bathmats, and, as high quality mats are eminently affordable, why not buy a different color mat for every day of the week?

Jan 102011
 

monogram

The concept of indicating ownership of a certain item through putting the owner’s initials on it in the form of a monogram has been around for centuries, and just because monograms were originally put on things like coins, fine paintings and expensive furniture, it doesn’t mean that they can’t appear on more mundane items like organic Bamboo or Supima towels, terry velour bathrobes and bath mats.

A monogram can be defined as a series of – usually three – letters of the alphabet that are either physically connected or just placed extremely close to one another. These letters can be painted on a hard surface, carved into wood or, for cloth items like luxury bath robes and quality bath towels, embroidered onto the material itself. Over the centuries, monograms have evolved from being symbols that indicate absolute ownership to being symbols of personal indulgence. Who, for instance, wouldn’t feel special to receive a soft beige Egyptian cotton Waffle bathrobe beautifully monogrammed with their own initials in a lovely contrasting color – cranberry, perhaps, or maybe fox – with a set of luxurious hand towels and a tubmat or spa mat to match?

In order for a symbol to be considered a classic monogram, the design has to follow certain rules. It is, for instance, customary to use the initials of a person’s first name, middle name and last name but not in that order: true monograms would show the last name’s initial in the middle and the first name’s and middle name’s initials to the left and right respectively. The last name’s initial would also be designed with a special flourish – perhaps larger or more elaborate than the other two letters – and an example of a traditional monogram found on kimono Turkish bathrobes and towels or eco friendly cotton kids robes for “Joe T Smith” would be “jSt”. Monograms are also available in a stunning array of colors, including such gems as apricot, lavender, papaya and raspberry.

Monograms are here to stay, and monogrammed towels and bathrobes will always make a lovely – not to mention highly appreciated – gift.

Dec 252010
 

Bamboo Towels

You’ll never guess what the latest craze is to make your bathroom eco-friendly. Want to try to guess?

“Is it saving water with a low-flow toilet?” No, that’s so 2008.

“What about saving water with a better shower head?” No, you’re still off the mark. Think of something other than water.

“I give up. Just tell me already!”

Ok, here it is: bamboo fiber towels. Now, I know what you must be thinking: “A towel made out of bamboo? No thank you, I’d rather use my welcome mat to dry myself.” If this is what comes to mind, however – a scratchy, uncomfortable towel destined to be the latest failed effort of the green movement – you’d be completely wrong.

Bamboo can be used for a whole array of applications. From durable scaffolding on high-rise construction, to resilient, beautiful flooring, it seems that the uses for this Asian plant will never end. The latest among these uses is bamboo towels and bamboo bathroom rugs.

Bamboo fiber is five times more absorbent than cotton, yet it dries even faster. While most types of textiles need chemical treatments or synthetic ingredients to achieve such bragging rights, the structure of bamboo fiber is perfect for drying. Bamboo fibers are oblong and hollow, which explains why they have such amazing absorbent and quick-drying capabilities.

Furthermore, bamboo is naturally anti-bacterial, resisting infiltration by staph bacteria, E. coli, and other bacteria types. Not only can a bamboo fiber towel improve your family’s health, its bacteria resistance also means that the towels don’t tend to start smelling.

Finally, bamboo is a renewable resource that can be grown organically. An organic bamboo fiber towel or bathroom rug gives you all the best that eco-friendly products have to offer.

Dec 162010
 

bathroom

Although luxury towels, bath mats and bathrobes may seem like Western concepts, a little research will show that almost every continent has chipped in to make robes, hand towels and bath towels what they are today.

The more popular styles of bathrobe include the waffle kimono and the terry velour kimono robes, and, of course, everyone knows that the kimono came out of Japan, where, for centuries, it was the outfit of choice for not only men and women, but children as well. The modern bathrobe is, in fact, extremely similar to the classic kimono as, not only can it too be worn by both sexes – and there are also special kids robes – the luxurious waffle and terry bathrobes can, just like today’s kimono, also be made from cotton and polyester.

The oriental influence can also be seen in the stunning line of quality bamboo towels and bathrobes that are made of an innovative bamboo cotton / rayon mix and that are also available in a myriad of colors. Bamboo is an extremely versatile plant that’s used to make anything from fabric to musical instruments, and it grows naturally in both East and South East Asia. Bamboo rayon is also a very important component of the soft, organic and eco friendly Turkish bathrobes/towels that are so popular today, and, as Turkey is one of the world’s major exporters of textiles, the latter also serves to highlight the Eurasian influence on quality bathroom wear.

Moving from Asia to Africa, the dark continent’s influence is nowhere more noticeable than in the world of bath towels where Egyptian cotton towels, although fairly rare, are among the best on the market. With or without a monogram, Egyptian cotton washcloths, hand towels and bath towels are highly sought after and are found not only in the luxury spa but also in the middle-class home right next to the more pedestrian tubmat and floor mat.

The USA is also part of the equation, and the cotton used to make the delectable Supima towels and bathrobes is cultivated in California, Texas, Arizona and New Mexico.

Oct 032010
 

Bamboo Towels

Towels are mostly made of cotton fibers. Nowadays, there are different types of fibers being used to manufacture towels, bathrobes, bath mats and bath textiles.

American Upland Cotton: which grows in the South, from Virginia to Oklahoma and Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California has short and durable fibers.

Egyptian Cotton: is known with its durability and absorbency. Egyptian cotton has extra long staple length grows in Egypt, which allows to produce luxurious towels worldwide.

Pima Cotton: which is considered as the highest quality cotton among those grows in US. Pima name is given after the Pima Indians who helped to develop this cotton type. This extra long staple cotton provides shiny, durable and firm fiber. Supima is the trademark that appears on products entirely made of pima cotton.

Sea Island Cotton: grows in the West indies and the islands of South Carolina and Georgia coast, known with its long staple and silky texture.

Organic Cotton: grows without using any pesticides, insecticides and defoliants. SKAL certified organic cotton is tested and verified according to international organic farming standards.

Turkish Cotton: grows in the Aegean and southeastern part of Turkey known with its strength and natural shine. The long staple fiber gives durability and softness.

Bamboo Fiber: is gaining popularity in the last 5 years. It is known as highly absorbent, antibacterial, soft and quick drying.

Microfiber: is a blend of polyester and polyamides which is a man made fiber known with its softness.

Linen: is made of fibers of the flax plant which is known with its smoothness and strength.