Nov 202010
 

Organic Towels

As our world evolves, the environment has become one of the number one concerns of its human inhabitants. These days you can buy eco friendly shopping bags, clothing, cleaning supplies, cosmetics, bath towels and more. Eco friendly bath towels have become more and more popular as a way to dry wet bodies and relax in comfort, but still be kind to the environment.

What is an eco friendly bath towel? It’s a towel made without the harmful chemicals used in standard towels. They are products made from fibers raised without pesticides and artificial fertilizers. Certified combed organic cotton towels are a good example of such products.

When washing these towels, make sure to stick to an eco friendly washing routine, as well. There are various organic laundry detergents available on the markets that are free of harmful chemicals. Do not use fabric softeners or bleaches. And consider removing your towels from the washing machine, shaking them and then hanging them to dry under the sun. If not, stick your towels in the dryer on a low setting.

Oct 232010
 

I have always been fascinated by colors and am totally in my element whenever I’m in a paint or crafts shop where hundreds of hues are displayed for my enjoyment. It wasn’t, however, until I started shopping for luxury towels and bathrobes that I realized I could provide a fix for my color addiction in my very own bathroom.

Quality bath towels and hand towels were on top of my list of must-buys, and I was simply stunned at the number of colors that towels are available in today. Egyptian cotton towels, for instance, come in no less than eight different colors ranging from the fairly predictable white and cream to the excitingly new espresso, meadow, rosebud and air blue. Supima towels, on the other hand, which are made of American Superior Pima cotton, come in such intriguing shades as bisque, merlot and tarragon while organic towels – 100% eco friendly – come in, among other colors, green tea, Aegean blue, coffee and stone. Bath mats were next on the list, and, when I looked at the luxurious Bamboo bath mats, I had a hard time choosing between the mat in adorable aloe, the tubmat in calming cloud and the bath mat in soft sandstone.

The world of bath robes also opened up a world of colors for me, and I was totally in my element exploring the different robe brands and their cleverly creative colors. The Terry kimono robes, for instance, came in sparkling white while the Waffle bathrobe was available in a beautiful shade of beige. The Ultra Soft cotton / bamboo bathrobes, on the other hand, dazzle the eye in coffee and the interesting shade of light blue that’s known as rain, and kids robes – possibly the most fun of them all – are pretty in pink and wonderful in white.

The fact that most of these Turkish bathrobes/towels and pure cotton bath mats are machine washable, of excellent quality and can even sport a monogram will – strangely – always be less important to me than the fact that they come in such gorgeous colors.

Oct 092010
 

towel cats

I always knew towels had their place in the home, bath-time wouldn’t be the same without them! but little did I realize how much my bath towels would mean to my cats until I relocated to California.

I had contracted with an international pet courier to transport my precious cats from Africa to Los Angeles, and they had mentioned that it would be a good idea to put some small personal item in the cat-carriers along with the cats to remind the kitties of home and to calm them down during the trip.

At first, I was at a loss as to what to put in the carriers but then I had an idea: I would put the cats’ favorite hand towels in with them. I had often seen how much my cats enjoyed lounging around on the gorgeously soft and luxurious bath towels and bath mats I had populated my bathroom with, and I knew these would be the perfect reminders of home to keep them company during their long journey.

Quality organic bath towels and hand towels – no matter whether they were made of Egyptian cotton, combed Egyptian cotton or the luxury cotton / bamboo rayon mix  have always been favorites of mine, and I’d bought enough of them over the years to keep my cats and I in towels for a good long time. (I had also bought enough matching Terry velour, Supima and Kimono bathrobes to populate a small country, but that’s another story!) It was therefore no problem at all to choose a towel or two to put in the carriers with each kitty duo – cats travel overseas in pairs – and I was happy to see that they snuggled down into the towels’ soft and silky material as soon as they were put into the carriers.

Three days – and many thousands of miles – later, the cats and their towels arrived in Los Angeles. Their flight to sunny California had treated them well, and they had luxuriated in their eco friendly towels all the way across the Atlantic.

Sep 302010
 

seals need towels

Save a Seal with a Towel.

A wildlife center in the UK is asking for towels, especially big towels, to use for sick and injured seals. The particular wildlife center, the RSPCA East Winch Wildlife Centre of Norfolk, England, cares for 50 seals and nearly three hundred other animals.

What will the big bath towels and beach towels be used for? The staff wraps the seals in the towels to make them easier to handle and to provide warmth for the animal.

Unfortunately, the wildlife center recently announced that they’re going through a shortage of towels at the moment, a problem which is reaching crisis proportions. As of September 21, 2010, the center is caring for 21 seals in their intensive care unit. With such a high level of care, the center is going through an astonishing 120 towels per day.

If you live in the UK, you can drop your new or used towel off at a nearby Tesco. If you live outside the UK, send a towel or two to:

RSPCA East Winch Wildlife Centre

East Winch

King’s Lynn

Norfolk, PE32 1NR

United Kingdom

Sep 282010
 

Bamboo Robe

I grew up in a hotel in semi-rural South Africa approximately thirty years ago, and, looking back at that time, I often wonder what life would have been like if I had had access then to the resources for bath mats, towels and bathrobes that I have now.

As I recall, the towel sets at the hotel consisted of hard, scratchy lengths of material that, now, wouldn’t be welcome in a prison, and, when I compare them to today’s pure cotton bath towels that are silky and soft but still durable, I often wonder how hotel guests dried off from their baths and managed to keep their skins intact. The hotel towels were all one color too – a non-committal off-white – and simply can’t compare to the beautiful Smoke Blue, Terracota, Garnet Red and TeaRose shades that high quality bath and hand towels come in today.

Complimentary luxury guest bath robes were also not an option in the South Africa of 30 years ago, and today’s travelers should realize how lucky they are when their hotels present them with decadent Terry Kimono bathrobes made out of 100% Turkish cotton or beautiful Bamboo bathrobes made out of a sultry mixture of Bamboo rayon and Egyptian cotton. Guests may also be confronted with a complimentary Waffle bathrobe when they open their bathroom door – and these look stylish in either white or beige – or, perhaps, with a Supima robe, which comes in such intriguing sounding colors as bisque and chestnut.

Concepts like “organic” and “eco friendly” were also totally foreign to the hotels of yesteryear because towels, tubmats and hand towels were made to last and not to add value to the environment. Times sure have changed: now guests can wander down to the hotel’s spa dressed in the finest Turkish bathrobes – even kids’ robes are available – and wallow in luxurious hydrotherapy tubs instead of sharing the austere communal bathroom at the end of the passage.

Given how today’s hotels differ from those of years long past, I can hardly wait to see the hotels of the future.