May 092011
 

towels

I remember being on a family vacation at about the age of ten, and as we were packing up to leave the hotel room, my father started to pack the hotel towels into our suitcases. My mother looked at him with a puzzled expression and asked him what he was doing. He replied, without fanfare, that we were taking the towels home.

“No!” she immediately exclaimed. “That’s tacky.”

They argued about it for a minute or two, but my father finally acquiesced and returned the towels to his rack. His argument had been that the hotel simply expects patrons to take the towels with them, not unlike the mini-soap and the mini-shampoo. My mother had a very different view on the situation, and couldn’t imagine (a) that the hotel wanted us to take their towels or (b) what need we had of the scratchy, white, and oft-used hotel towels at home anyway.

Technology Bests Criminals Again

If that family vacation had been taken today, however, my father might not have been so quick to start packing the towels. These days, many of the fanciest hotels are incorporating radio frequency identification, or RFID-chips, into their towels and robes.

There’s nothing new about RFID-chips. They have long been used to prevent the theft of books, to track the movement of animals, and to prevent illegal logging, but up until now they were not part of a hotel’s security system.

As of April 2011, three upscale hotels have invested in the RFID technology. They’ve put tags on their towels, their bathrobes, and other linens. A hotel in Hawaii says that before they tagged their towels, they would lose an astonishing 4,000 per month to people like my Dad. Now that everything’s tagged, that number has fallen to 750. While there are still 750 towel thefts per month, it’s a heck of a lot better than 4,000. The hotels are said to save almost $16,000 per month. Remember this the next time you’re tempted to take a towel or a bathrobe home with you as a vacation memento!

 

Feb 012011
 

bath

Luxurious oil-rubbed bronze bath fixtures and spa accessories are very popular consumer products this season. This type of bronze finishing is chemically enhanced to simulate the naturally aged-bronze patinas that are found on items in antique stores and museums. The shapes of these metal products are new and modern in appearance; however, the luxury finishing treatments that are applied on top of the metals can make them appear to be old.

Are the oil-rubbed bronze bathroom fixtures a good value?

The appearance of traditional bronze bars for towels or hooks for robes includes a shiny finish. As bronze ages, the shine deteriorates into a non-glossy darkened surface patina that still includes a shimmering hint of the base-metal colors underneath. New oil-rubbed bronze metals display elegant Turkish bathrobes / towels, common cotton bath towels and all other styles of consumer or industrial linens with excellent stunning visual results.

The best way to describe rubbed-bronze finishes is through a comparison to the luscious variety of browns that are found in chocolate bars. The soft chocolaty surface layer on the oil-rubbed bronze fixtures is often gently illuminated by using copper or a copper-like metal during the manufacturing processes. Consumers everywhere are thrilled with their new shimmering bars for hand towels, hooks for kids’ robes and other types of fixtures.

Value: Interior design experts are always searching for appropriate metal parts and fixtures that are long-life products with an ability to remain fashionable throughout the constantly changing trends in consumer products. Oil-rubbed bronze fixtures will stay fashionable for a long time while they display eco-friendly Egyptian towels, monogrammed towels or waffle bathrobe sets and all manner of terry bathroom products. The new sturdy oil-rubbed bronze bathroom fixtures and accessories are fashionable long-life products.