Nov 132011
 

bathrobes

It’s a little known, but interesting, fact that bathrobes are classified into different categories on the basis of factors like the type of neckline or collar they have, the type of fabric they’re made from, the type of weave displayed and the type of sculpture sewn onto the fabric.

If robes are categorized according to their collar type, then those with hooded collars, kimono-style collars and shawl collars would dominate the market. The hooded collar bathrobes are quite self-explanatory, and contemporary fashion is actually inundated with items of clothing of the “hoodie” variety. Kimono-style robes all, for all intents and purposes, collar-less, and, on the whole, this makes for an extremely comfortable robe with great flexibility of style. Last but not least are the robes with shawl collars, which are collars that are able to be drawn together around the wearer’s neck.

Bathrobes are made from only certain types of fabric – those with above average absorbency – and robes made out of wool, nylon and silk are common. A fairly new innovation in the world of bathrobes was the advent of synthetic microfiber, and more and more robes are now being manufactured from this material, which is both super-absorbent and super-lightweight. The way the fabric is woven is also extremely important, and, to date, four very specific bathrobe weave styles have developed: terry, waffle, velour and flannel. The major difference between these four weaves concerns whether or not the fabric has loops, and whether these loops are cut or uncut, and this would influence things like how heavy and absorbent the robes are.

Bathrobes are among the only items of clothing that have sculpture – “bas-relief” type fabric texturing – sewn onto the basic fabric. Fabric sculpture is also known as styling, and styling is added to a base fabric for a number of reasons including increasing the fabric’s water absorbency and adding weight to the garment, which is desirable as the heavier the robe, the better it will hang. There are many different sculpture patterns, with linear patterns like Window Pane, Zig-zag and Ribbed possibly being the most common, and buyers can choose whichever pattern they find most attractive.

There’s truly a lot more to the simple bathrobe than what meets the eye, and buyers are spoiled for choice when they are shopping for robes that promise quality, stylishness, absorbency and durability and yet won’t break the budget.

Jun 182011
 

Bamboo Bathrobes

It seems highly unlikely that the classic terrycloth bathrobe will ever go out of style. To be sure, no other type of material provides us with the complete comfort and sense of relaxation that a genuine terry robe does. Even the best quality hotels and spas understand the lasting desirability of this soft, soothing, fluffy variety of after-bath wear. While it may be possible to approximate the classic casual look of a true terry robe, no one can fool the well-informed public on this matter when it comes to absolute luxury in casual spa, sauna and home post-bathing wear.

Can you imagine attempting to create the ultimate comfort in such a robe without the fluff and fuzz of authentic terry? I think we’ll all heartily agree that it can’t be done. By nature, the fluff allows for air circulation while the fuzz provides utmost comfort and a mandatory sense of luxury and laziness. After all, none of us are in the slightest mood for hustle and bustle following a totally relaxing, leisurely bath or shower. It’s high time to do just the opposite–stretch out and luxuriate in the depths of tantalizing terry. Just the texture of this marvelous material obviously created just to offer the very top quality in creature comforts, makes us languish in lazy la-la land until otherwise directed to any necessary activity. You can tarry in your terry robe to your heart’s desire until something of vital importance comes along to burst your leisure-time bubble.

Most of us have, from time to time, broken out of this terry pattern of perfection to tentatively try other styles and materials in bathrobes. Yet, to date, nothing truly measures up to the endearing design and delicious decadence of an authentic terry robe. Perhaps in years to come some clever swim-and-bath-wear designer will venture forth with a possible substitution. But in the meantime, the vast majority of the leisurely-living and long-time lounging population will probably hang on to that comforting terrycloth wardrobe. After all, it packs well when traveling and never requires ironing. In addition, terrycloth towels are still in vogue, so why not terry ready-to-wear togs? This way, we can all continue to relax to our hearts’ content well-wrapped in the fluff and flair of modern-day terry-wear.

 

 

Jun 122011
 

towels

It is easy to save money in the kitchen through following the examples of our ancestors. Before paper towels were invented, people would use cotton hand towels to clean messy spills in their homes. In 1931, Scott Paper Company created the first roll of paper towels for use in the kitchen; however, people successfully cleaned spills in their kitchens with bath towels, or soft pieces of terry towels, long before this date.

In 1931, when the first paper towels were introduced, the public scoffed at these frivolous fineries that would create ongoing unnecessary expenses in the home. The act of buying expensive paper sheets to throw away instantly was a luxury that most homes could not afford while their sturdy Egyptian cotton household towels would last for many years. The general public did not embrace the use of paper towels until after World War II.

Modern housewives are misunderstanding the term: kitchen rag. When World War II drew to a close, women were working in war-oriented establishments. As the men came home and retrieved their jobs, females remained employed outside of the home. Many believed that there was little time to hand-wash their messy cloth kitchen rags; however, most people do not hand-wash their bathrobes, bath mats or towels today.

Historically, women did not use rags in their kitchens. Most women took pride in the appearance of their homes and used brand new eco-friendly cotton towels to mop away household spills. Thrifty housewives would purchase one large bathroom towel, tub mat, or absorbent waffle bathrobe and cut these items into sizes that worked for their cleaning needs. Luxurious Turkish bathrobes/towels or kids robes became the new cleaning rags.

Women would keep their soiled kitchen rags in a covered bucket or jar of soapy water that was kept under the kitchen sink. The strong soapy water allowed the towel to refresh between small kitchen uses. Today, many households spend $5.00 each week on rolls of paper towels that are not necessary. Organic cotton spa towels, bathroom towels or hand towels can be used to replace a paper towel habit for hundreds of dollars in savings.

 

Dec 212010
 

Platinum Robes

After a long summer that didn’t seem to want to end, people all across the United States are suddenly finding themselves in the midst of one of the coldest, snowiest Decembers on record.

In Minneapolis, there’s been so much snow that the inflatable roof of the Metrodome actually collapsed – a first. For the Twin Cities, the recent snowfall is the fifth biggest on record.

The rest of the Midwest isn’t faring much better; blizzards have been swirling around now for a couple of weeks. Colorado, too, is reporting record snow, and the white stuff has been spotted as far south as North Carolina and Alabama.

Get Thee a Bathrobe!

Given the record cold, anyone without a terry cotton bathrobe is simply tempting fate – or else has never experienced the joy of staying home from work or school wrapped up in a terry cotton bathrobe, sipping on coffee, watching bright red cardinals flit about in a whitened winter wonderland.

A terry cotton bathrobe is both man and woman’s best friend this time of year, and it doesn’t have to remain in use just to make it to and from the bathroom. On those snowed-in days when all you really want to do is sit around the house in warm slippers in front of a peaceful fire, a soft terry cotton bathrobe is the perfect accessory to drape on over your flannel pajamas.

Dec 162010
 

bathroom

Although luxury towels, bath mats and bathrobes may seem like Western concepts, a little research will show that almost every continent has chipped in to make robes, hand towels and bath towels what they are today.

The more popular styles of bathrobe include the waffle kimono and the terry velour kimono robes, and, of course, everyone knows that the kimono came out of Japan, where, for centuries, it was the outfit of choice for not only men and women, but children as well. The modern bathrobe is, in fact, extremely similar to the classic kimono as, not only can it too be worn by both sexes – and there are also special kids robes – the luxurious waffle and terry bathrobes can, just like today’s kimono, also be made from cotton and polyester.

The oriental influence can also be seen in the stunning line of quality bamboo towels and bathrobes that are made of an innovative bamboo cotton / rayon mix and that are also available in a myriad of colors. Bamboo is an extremely versatile plant that’s used to make anything from fabric to musical instruments, and it grows naturally in both East and South East Asia. Bamboo rayon is also a very important component of the soft, organic and eco friendly Turkish bathrobes/towels that are so popular today, and, as Turkey is one of the world’s major exporters of textiles, the latter also serves to highlight the Eurasian influence on quality bathroom wear.

Moving from Asia to Africa, the dark continent’s influence is nowhere more noticeable than in the world of bath towels where Egyptian cotton towels, although fairly rare, are among the best on the market. With or without a monogram, Egyptian cotton washcloths, hand towels and bath towels are highly sought after and are found not only in the luxury spa but also in the middle-class home right next to the more pedestrian tubmat and floor mat.

The USA is also part of the equation, and the cotton used to make the delectable Supima towels and bathrobes is cultivated in California, Texas, Arizona and New Mexico.