Aug 132011
 

Bathtub Addition Towels

The idea of soaking in a warm, relaxing bath is a thought that appeals to many. In addition to the benefit of solitude and quiet in a bathtub, the warm water stimulates the body’s blood flow, an effect that has the well-known result of reducing tensions both physical and mental. While bathers that are truly tired and stressed out find it easy to “check out” and relax, others may find a bath rather boring! The remedy? A selection of fun and interesting bathtub additions that can turn any relaxing soak into one that’s stimulating for all the senses.

Bath Bombs

Sometimes called fizzies, tablets, or bathballs, bath bombs are spheres of baking soda, colors, scented oils, flower petals, and other fun ingredients that fizz when added to the bathwater. The water and baking soda react to one another, providing a science-fair-like stream of bubbles that feel good on sore backs and feet. The oils and other additives float in the tub, coloring the water fun hues like blue or rose, and in some cases even shedding sparkling glitter along the way. Bath bomb addicts recommend sliding large bombs or ones with a lot of “confetti” into a knotted hosiery sock before tossing it in the bath, thereby keeping any stray pieces in an easy-to-toss container.

Bubble Bath

This familiar favorite of kids everywhere is one that moms and dads are calling their own these days. With the development of solid “bubble bars” that can be crumbled under running water, luxurious scents like chocolate, lavender and orange blossom are quickly gaining popularity over youthful “bubble gum” type scents. People of all ages love a big tub of bubbles, after all!

Bath Salts

As much a staple of the high-end bath experience as Turkish bathrobes, bathers are enjoying this spa ritual at home on their own time. Made from actual salt crystals blended with essential oils and occasionally herbs, bath salts help open the pores for true relaxation. When using salts, be sure to put the crystals in while the bath is filling up, otherwise you may end up sitting on an uncomfortable patch of gravel.

Whether using one addition or several, these fun and enjoyable products can turn any regular bath into an experience you’ll be anxious to repeat. Happy bathing!

Mar 022011
 

cotton

Some folks have plenty reason to say “I wish I was in the land of cotton”, and it’s no coincidence that these are the folks who have not yet discovered the wonderful world of luxury Egyptian cotton bathrobes, hand towels, bath mats and bath towels.

The story of the cotton blossom began in Mexico a little over eight thousand years ago and, at that stage, there was no way that the primitive laborers could know that their efforts would – many, many hundreds of years later – result in the manufacture of such quality items as the luxurious Supima towel, made of 100% American Superior Pima Cotton, and the eco friendly organic towel, which is made of natural cotton to create the perfect bath towel.

Cotton is not, however, only used to make towels, and this versatile fabric is also the main ingredient in bath robes – including kids robes – as well as most kinds of bathroom mat and tubmat.

In the early days, cotton was also cultivated in such exotic places as India, Iran and far Arabia, but it’s a good bet that the early nomadic traders didn’t carry the organic Terry Kimono bathrobe – made of 100% Turkish cotton – the Platinum bathrobe, which is manufactured completely out of Egyptian cotton, or the Waffle bathrobe, complete with monogram, among their trading goods. The popularity of cotton garments slowly spread across Asia, Europe, Africa and both the Americas, but it took Britain’s Industrial Revolution – with its almost instantaneous infusion of mass produced cotton clothing – to make cotton goods accessible to almost every family on earth.

Today cotton is the main ingredient of several different types of material including the striped seersucker, the heavier and ridged corduroy and the highly absorbent terrycloth, which is the basis of almost all towels and bathrobes. Today’s top cotton-producing countries include the Peoples’ Republic of China, the USA and Pakistan, but not all of these countries are able to compete on the same level as those with less developed infrastructures are not able to command as high a price for their cotton as the more well developed third world countries.

None of our favorite soft Turkish bathrobes/towels, tubmats and spa mats would be the same without that magical white fluffy plant known as cotton, and this magical snowy-white plant will continue to be cultivated for decades to come.

 

Feb 012011
 

bath

Luxurious oil-rubbed bronze bath fixtures and spa accessories are very popular consumer products this season. This type of bronze finishing is chemically enhanced to simulate the naturally aged-bronze patinas that are found on items in antique stores and museums. The shapes of these metal products are new and modern in appearance; however, the luxury finishing treatments that are applied on top of the metals can make them appear to be old.

Are the oil-rubbed bronze bathroom fixtures a good value?

The appearance of traditional bronze bars for towels or hooks for robes includes a shiny finish. As bronze ages, the shine deteriorates into a non-glossy darkened surface patina that still includes a shimmering hint of the base-metal colors underneath. New oil-rubbed bronze metals display elegant Turkish bathrobes / towels, common cotton bath towels and all other styles of consumer or industrial linens with excellent stunning visual results.

The best way to describe rubbed-bronze finishes is through a comparison to the luscious variety of browns that are found in chocolate bars. The soft chocolaty surface layer on the oil-rubbed bronze fixtures is often gently illuminated by using copper or a copper-like metal during the manufacturing processes. Consumers everywhere are thrilled with their new shimmering bars for hand towels, hooks for kids’ robes and other types of fixtures.

Value: Interior design experts are always searching for appropriate metal parts and fixtures that are long-life products with an ability to remain fashionable throughout the constantly changing trends in consumer products. Oil-rubbed bronze fixtures will stay fashionable for a long time while they display eco-friendly Egyptian towels, monogrammed towels or waffle bathrobe sets and all manner of terry bathroom products. The new sturdy oil-rubbed bronze bathroom fixtures and accessories are fashionable long-life products.

Jan 162011
 

bath

January is recognized as, ‘National Bath Safety Month’ in America, and observed globally by other regions on the planet. Wherever people, slippery soaps, and water merge, there can be unexpected slip or fall accidents happen. To guard against these bath-time mishaps, many people plan ahead before they start their cleaning processes.

Safety tips:

  • Towels, bathrobes, and bathmats should be placed into an area of the bathroom where they can be reached easily from inside or outside of the tub. Bath towels, robes, and thick luxury mats within arms reach can be used to keep a person warm if they cannot get up after falling.
  • Always place a soft cotton towel or terry hand towels under a cell phone that is resting on a bathroom counter. If a fall occurs after a bath, the edge of the towel can be tugged easily from the floor to aide in reaching the phone.
  • For children, your eco-friendly kid’s robes, organic Egyptian cotton towels, and luxurious tubmat collection can be stored in a sturdy basket. During bath-time, this heavy basket can rest on top of the toilet lid to deter small children from playing in that unsafe water.

Bathroom safety goes beyond the preventative steps that we take to avoid injuries and falls. In some homes, kimono robes, waffle bathrobes, and Turkish bathrobes/towels are used to prevent bathers from getting sick after they step out of the bathtub. Monogram spa robes and terry-style bathrobes are popular germ-fighting accessories in homes, at the gym, and in motels or resorts everywhere.

Dec 162010
 

bathroom

Although luxury towels, bath mats and bathrobes may seem like Western concepts, a little research will show that almost every continent has chipped in to make robes, hand towels and bath towels what they are today.

The more popular styles of bathrobe include the waffle kimono and the terry velour kimono robes, and, of course, everyone knows that the kimono came out of Japan, where, for centuries, it was the outfit of choice for not only men and women, but children as well. The modern bathrobe is, in fact, extremely similar to the classic kimono as, not only can it too be worn by both sexes – and there are also special kids robes – the luxurious waffle and terry bathrobes can, just like today’s kimono, also be made from cotton and polyester.

The oriental influence can also be seen in the stunning line of quality bamboo towels and bathrobes that are made of an innovative bamboo cotton / rayon mix and that are also available in a myriad of colors. Bamboo is an extremely versatile plant that’s used to make anything from fabric to musical instruments, and it grows naturally in both East and South East Asia. Bamboo rayon is also a very important component of the soft, organic and eco friendly Turkish bathrobes/towels that are so popular today, and, as Turkey is one of the world’s major exporters of textiles, the latter also serves to highlight the Eurasian influence on quality bathroom wear.

Moving from Asia to Africa, the dark continent’s influence is nowhere more noticeable than in the world of bath towels where Egyptian cotton towels, although fairly rare, are among the best on the market. With or without a monogram, Egyptian cotton washcloths, hand towels and bath towels are highly sought after and are found not only in the luxury spa but also in the middle-class home right next to the more pedestrian tubmat and floor mat.

The USA is also part of the equation, and the cotton used to make the delectable Supima towels and bathrobes is cultivated in California, Texas, Arizona and New Mexico.

Nov 182010
 

Robe

The bathroom in my new one-bedroom apartment was covered in small tiles of speckled robin’s egg blue-on-white, but the carpets in the living room and bedroom were champagne brown, which dictated that all bath towels, bath mats and bathrobes had to be in shades of brown.

I had moved into my new apartment on the Monday and, by Thursday, was ready to launch myself into the mundane yet delicate business of populating it with quality towels and luxurious bath robes. I had never, however, suspected that my choice would be limited by the apartment’s color scheme, but I was now convinced that nothing but beige, chocolate brown and perhaps a greyish-hued taupe would compliment the carpets and painted accent wall. Hand towels, a tubmat or two and almost certainly more than one soft waffle bathrobe were on the must-buy list, and the challenge would be to find them in colors complimenting those resident in the apartment.

I chose to shop online and was immediately confronted with choices that ranged from eco friendly and Egyptian cotton to organic and bamboo rayon/cotton mix. I was also barraged with browns and found myself contemplating the advantages of the ecru – whitish brown – bamboo bath towel over those of the chestnut-shaded luxury supima towel. The waffle bathrobe was brilliant in beige and looked equally as good with or without a monogram, and I was debating whether or not to buy it along with either the taupe and chocolate renaissance towels or the coffee and linen organic towels. As far as bath towels went, however, the adventure was not over, and my attention was soon diverted by the cayenne-colored elegance towels and – this was possibly the most exciting of all – the espresso, lite gold, chocolate-charcoal, cream and rosebud Egyptian cotton towels.

All too soon my buying spree was over, and I was anxiously awaiting delivery of my delicious cream, chocolate and espresso Turkish bathrobes/towels and tub mat set. When they arrived, they complimented the apartment’s color scheme perfectly and even made the somewhat unappealing robin’s egg blue tiles seem more acceptable.

Sep 282010
 

Bamboo Robe

I grew up in a hotel in semi-rural South Africa approximately thirty years ago, and, looking back at that time, I often wonder what life would have been like if I had had access then to the resources for bath mats, towels and bathrobes that I have now.

As I recall, the towel sets at the hotel consisted of hard, scratchy lengths of material that, now, wouldn’t be welcome in a prison, and, when I compare them to today’s pure cotton bath towels that are silky and soft but still durable, I often wonder how hotel guests dried off from their baths and managed to keep their skins intact. The hotel towels were all one color too – a non-committal off-white – and simply can’t compare to the beautiful Smoke Blue, Terracota, Garnet Red and TeaRose shades that high quality bath and hand towels come in today.

Complimentary luxury guest bath robes were also not an option in the South Africa of 30 years ago, and today’s travelers should realize how lucky they are when their hotels present them with decadent Terry Kimono bathrobes made out of 100% Turkish cotton or beautiful Bamboo bathrobes made out of a sultry mixture of Bamboo rayon and Egyptian cotton. Guests may also be confronted with a complimentary Waffle bathrobe when they open their bathroom door – and these look stylish in either white or beige – or, perhaps, with a Supima robe, which comes in such intriguing sounding colors as bisque and chestnut.

Concepts like “organic” and “eco friendly” were also totally foreign to the hotels of yesteryear because towels, tubmats and hand towels were made to last and not to add value to the environment. Times sure have changed: now guests can wander down to the hotel’s spa dressed in the finest Turkish bathrobes – even kids’ robes are available – and wallow in luxurious hydrotherapy tubs instead of sharing the austere communal bathroom at the end of the passage.

Given how today’s hotels differ from those of years long past, I can hardly wait to see the hotels of the future.